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ReliefWeb - Updates

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    Source: International Organization for Migration
    Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Belgium, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Georgia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Lebanon, Luxembourg, Morocco, Nepal, Russian Federation, World

    Migration in the 21st Century: reflections & prospects for 2050 The Director General of IOM, Ambassador

    William Lacy Swing, participated in the conference "Migration in the 21st Century: reflections and prospects for 2050” at the Palais d'Egmont in Brussels on 17 May 2016.

    This conference, organized by the Belgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation, coincides with the celebration of the 65th anniversary of IOM and the Belgian presidency of the IOM Council.

    Pictures of the event are available on our Flickr album, and a short video report can be accessed here.

    For more info, visit our website


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    Source: International Crisis Group
    Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    CrisisWatch is a monthly early warning bulletin designed to provide a regular update on the state of the most significant situations of conflict around the world.

    Global Overview, August 2016

    The month saw Yemen’s peace talks collapse with violence there intensifying, and the Syrian conflict escalate following Ankara’s launch of a cross-border ground offensive against Islamic State (IS) and Kurdish forces, days after a major terror attack in Turkey’s south east. Troop deployments in Western Sahara threatened to bring about clashes, and violence flared in the Central African Republic. In Ethiopia and Zimbabwe, security forces brutally suppressed anti-government protests, while in Gabon, the president’s disputed re-election triggered violent clashes. In Asia, a suicide bombing killed over 70 people in Pakistan, while suspected militants in Thailand’s southern insurgency launched attacks on targets outside the traditional conflict zone. In positive news, peace talks between the Philippines government and communist rebel groups resumed after a four-year hiatus. On 24 August, Colombia and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) declared that they had reached a final peace accord, paving the way for an end to 52 years of armed conflict.


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    Source: International Crisis Group
    Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    Global Overview OCTOBER 2016

    October saw Venezuela’s tense political standoff at new heights amid economic stress and popular unrest, and Haiti’s weak political and security equilibrium struck by a major natural disaster and humanitarian crisis. In Africa, violence worsened in the Central African Republic (CAR), north-eastern Kenya, Mozambique and western Niger, while in Ethiopia the government hardened its response to continued protests. In Myanmar, unprecedented attacks on police in the north triggered deadly clashes and displacement threatening to exacerbate intercommunal tensions across the country, while Russia’s North Caucasus saw an increase in conflict-related casualties, detentions and counter-terrorism operations. In the Middle East, the election of Michel Aoun as president of Lebanon signals a long-awaited breakthrough ending two years of political deadlock.


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    Source: International Crisis Group
    Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    Global Overview NOVEMBER 2016

    November saw violence escalate again in Syria, Myanmar, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Cameroon. Attacks by pro-regime forces on rebel strongholds in Syria resumed, causing significant civilian casualties. In Myanmar’s Rakhine state intensifying violence displaced tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims, while a major attack by armed groups near the Chinese border threatened to undermine the country’s fragile ethnic peace process. In DRC, violence rose in the east and the regime continued to repress dissent, underscoring the risk that renewed protests, likely in December when President Kabila’s second term officially ends, could turn violent. In Cameroon, Boko Haram stepped up its attacks in the Far North and minority English-speakers clashed with security forces in the North West region. The victory of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election on 8 November created uncertainty about possible shifts in future U.S. foreign policy priorities and positions, including on a number of conflicts and prominent geostrategic arenas – among them the future of the historic multilateral nuclear accord with Iran.


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    Source: Danish Refugee Council
    Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Congo, Egypt, Greece, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Lebanon, Morocco, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World

    Eastern Mediterranean Route

    The number of people arriving by sea to Europe sizeably fell in 2016, with only 362,376 recorded arrivals compared to 1,014,973 in 2015 (UNHCR, 2016). Numbers migrating along the Eastern Mediterranean route have also substantially decreased. In 2016, only 173,450 people – compared to 856,723 last year – crossed over by sea from Turkey to Greece. In fact, 87% of those arrivals occurred during the first three months of the year, before the signing of the EU-Turkey Statement. In addition, the Turkish Coast Guards reported a decrease in the number of interceptions (833 compared to 2,430 last year) and apprehensions (down by 60%) in 2016. Despite the reduction in arrivals, total figures for 2016 remain 3 times higher than yearly average arrivals between 2008-2014. According to IOM, as of February 8, 2017 approximately 74,909 refugees and migrants are stranded at the borders of Greece and the Western Balkans. In fact, this buildup has been gradually increasing as border controls across Europe have tightened even further. Since the March 2016, those stranded at the Greek and Bulgarian borders have increased by 47% and 443% respectively.

    EU-Turkey Statement

    As of February 2017, 894 people have been returned to Turkey as part of the EU-Turkey Statement and 386 under the already existing Greece-Turkey readmission agreement as of January 2017. Asylum seekers in Greece can be returned to Turkey if they do not apply for asylum or withdraw an asylum application in Greece; opt for an assisted return; after a negative asylum claim; and, lastly, when an asylum claim has been found ‘inadmissible’ – that is, on the grounds that Turkey is either a ‘safe first country’ (where a person has been recognised as a refugee or otherwise enjoys sufficient protection) or a ‘safe third country’ (namely, that Turkey can provide protection to the returned person).
    Turkey’s status as a ‘safe third country’ has however been challenged in Greek courts throughout the year. In February 2017, the Greek Council of State (the Supreme Administrative Court) unanimously rejected two separate appeal cases by concluding that Turkey qualifies as a safe third country. For the moment, the issue has been referred to the grand Chamber of the Court for further consideration, where a final decision is expected to be made. However, if approved, the decision could potentially open the door for an accelerated returns process that would significantly increase the number of returnees from the EU.

    Restrictions at the Turkish-Syrian border

    Border restrictions continued in 2016 with Turkish Land Forces apprehending 424,641 individuals, 80% at the Syrian border. Construction of a concrete wall along the 911km Turkish-Syrian border continues, with plans to complete it by end of 2017. Of the nineteen official border crossing points between the two countries, only two (Cilvegozu and Oncupinar) are currently open for Syrians with emergency medical health needs. Despite the number of registered Syrians in Turkey rising to 2,841,036, there is a modest trend in return figures as 23,926 Syrians were reported to have returned to Jarablus during the last quarter of 2016. The Turkish government continues to advocate for a safe zone in Northern Syria where Syrians can return to, the latest effort through involvement in the evacuation of Eastern Aleppo and the construction of IDP camps in Idlib, Syria aimed at stemming flows into Turkey. This policy of assisting displaced populations within Syria is mostly evident in Jarablus and Azaz where Turkish authorities have increased reconstruction efforts aimed at laying the groundwork for voluntary return.


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    Source: UN General Assembly
    Country: Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belize, Bhutan, Botswana, Cabo Verde, Cambodia, China, Comoros, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Paraguay, Republic of Korea, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Turkey, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    Note by the Secretary-General

    The Secretary-General has the honour to transmit to the General Assembly the report of the Director-General of the World Health Organization, submitted in accordance with General Assembly resolution 70/300.

    Report of the Director-General of the World Health Organization on consolidating gains and accelerating efforts to control and eliminate malaria in developing countries, particularly in Africa, by 2030

    Summary

    The present report is submitted in response to General Assembly resolution 70/300. It provides a review of progress in the implementation of the resolution, focusing on the adoption and scaling-up of interventions recommended by the World Health Organization in malaria-endemic countries. It provides an assessment of progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals and resolution 70/300. It elaborates on the challenges limiting the full achievement of the targets, and provides recommendations to ensure that progress is accelerated towards the goals of the Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030 in the coming years.

    I. Introduction

    1. While malaria is a preventable and treatable disease, it continues to have a devastating impact on people’s health and livelihoods around the world. There were an estimated 212 million malaria cases and an estimated 429,000 deaths from malaria globally in 2015, with 70 per cent of these deaths occurring among children under 5 years of age in sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a multi-pronged strategy to reduce the malaria burden, including vector control interventions, preventive therapies, diagnostic testing, quality-assured treatment and strong malaria surveillance.

    2. The present report highlights progress and challenges in the control and elimination of malaria in the context of General Assembly resolution 70/300, drawing on the World Malaria Report 2016, issued by WHO in December 2016. The analysis is based on the latest available comprehensive data (2015) received from malaria-endemic countries and organizations supporting global malaria efforts. Data from 2016 are currently being collected and reviewed by WHO.

    3. Between 2000 and 2015, malaria received worldwide recognition as a priority global health issue. Under the umbrella of the Roll Back Malaria Partnership, endemic countries, United Nations agencies, bilateral donors, public-private partnerships, scientific organizations, academic institutions, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector worked together to scale up WHO-recommended interventions, harmonize activities and improve strategic planning, programme management and funding availability. Together with HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and other neglected tropical diseases, malaria control was included under Goal 3, target 3, of the Sustainable Development Goals, which aims to “end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and other neglected tropical diseases” by the year 2030. WHO interprets this target as the attainment of the targets of the Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030. The Global Technical Strategy sets the target of reducing the malaria disease burden by at least 40 per cent by 2020 and by at least 90 per cent by 2030. It also aims to eliminate the disease in at least 35 new countries by 2030.

    4. The success of efforts to control and eliminate malaria is measured through an analysis of trends in the disease burden and intervention scale-up, and a review of progress made towards the global goals and targets of the Global Technical Strategy, which were agreed through a broad, consultative process.


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